Grocery Shopping with a disability

Do you find shopping hard? Overwhelming, painful or exhausting? This post shares energy saving strategies you could use to make shopping easier for you and your family Continue reading Grocery Shopping with a disability

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Helpful tips for exercising when depressed

During my low periods exercising, particularly in winter is exceptionally hard. If you are like me, my ideal exercise routine involves exercising inside where no one sees or hear me. Perhaps you are like me and you are experiencing back pain, or maybe another disability or added pressures of caring for another…lets be honest, exercising is hard.Unfortunately, lack of exercise places people with mental illness … Continue reading Helpful tips for exercising when depressed

Activities to do when you are angry

Anger is a valid and vital emotion for looking after ourselves. It lets us know that we have been hurt, our boundaries have not been respected or our needs have not been met. Anger is also a common symptom of experiencing trauma, feeling invalidated and misheard. It is important that we learn how to release our anger safely and effectively. For some of us, this … Continue reading Activities to do when you are angry

Fitness to Practice as a Student with a Disability

Speaking as someone who had a few Fitness to Practice reviews while doing my undergrad, and am now facing one as a postgrad, I know how terrifying this process can be. And it can evoke a lot of anger and resentment towards uni too, and that’s important to acknowledge, but use that to fuel your passion further! I wanted to take a couple of minutes to talk through how I prepared for my FtP reviews Continue reading Fitness to Practice as a Student with a Disability

My distress checklist for Carers, Partners, Family and Friends

Being in a relationship with someone who has BPD is hard. It requires a lot of thinking on your feet. A lot of open communication and forgiveness on both sides.
I frequently get angry at my husband when he says or does something that is triggering for me. It takes a lot of trial and error to work out those triggers. It takes understanding that “silly triggers” such as him “slamming the microwave door” can send me into the flight, fight or freeze mode. In these situations, my husband and I use this framework to know what to do next. I have also sent this framework to several loved ones so they too are knowledgeable in helping someone in distress. Continue reading My distress checklist for Carers, Partners, Family and Friends